How to Choose Carpet Fiber

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How to Choose Carpet Fiber

When you're shopping for carpet, the fiber from which it's made will be your most important consideration. Think about fiber in relation to other aspects of the carpet you're considering. Some fibers are best with low-loop or low-pile carpets. Some fibers can be solution dyed-- the color is mixed in when the fiber is being made. A low-grade, poorly made carpet may not be a value, no matter what the fiber. When you're shopping for carpet, the fiber from which it's made will be your most important consideration. Remember that no fiber is right for all situations. Traffic: Is the carpet for a bedroom, where there will be minimal wear and tear? Or a family room, where there will be more? Or a hallway or stairway, which receives the most? Budget: Prices vary quite widely. You should look for the best value that you can afford. Moisture: Carpet for a bathroom, pool, basement or kitchen area may be exposed to dampness. Some fibers tolerate it, some don't. Lifetime: Do you want the carpet to last for decades? Or are you planning to replace it in a few years? Pets and children: Are there likely to be spills and accidents? Kids playing on the floor? You should consider these things before choosing a fiber. Think about fiber in relation to other aspects of the carpet you're considering. Some fibers are best with low-loop or low-pile carpets. Some require greater density or more yarn twist. Dying method is another consideration. Some fibers can be solution dyed-- the color is mixed in when the fiber is being made. With stock dying, the fiber is dyed later and the color does not penetrate. Think of the difference between a radish and a carrot; the carrot, like solution-dyed fiber, is the same color throughout. Stock dying leaves the color on the surface, as it is with the radish, red on the white and outside on the inside. Solution dying usually results in a smaller range of colors available, but greater resistance to fading. Remember that not all fibers of a particular type are identical. There are different grades and qualities of every type of fiber. A low-grade, poorly made carpet may not be a value, no matter what the fiber. tips

How to Choose Carpet Fiber

Carpet fiber is only one of the factors that you need to consider. Equally important are carpet construction factors like density, filament type and twist level. In this week’s post, we’ll look the difference between fibers and next week we’ll talk about carpet construction.

How to Choose Carpet FiberNylon vs. Polyester Carpet: Which is Better?

Carpet Fiber: Carpet’s Basic Ingredient

The four basic fibers used in carpet today are nylon, polypropylene (Olefin), polyester and wool. Since synthetic fibers make up 99 % of the fiber in the US carpet industry, we’ll focus on them.

Nylon Carpet

Durable, Resilient & Versatile

Olefin carpets work well anywhere you need stain and fade resistance– in rooms with strong sunlight, indoor/outdoor rooms, kitchens, children’s playrooms & bedrooms, and basements.

Nylon is more expensive than other synthetic carpet fibers and is the most commonly used carpet fiber today. Nylon is the most versatile of all fibers, providing flexibility in creating a variety of carpet styles– from sumptuous plush to fashion-forward patterns to low-maintenance loop (Berber).

Polypropylene (Olefin).

Unbranded nylons offer a considerable benefit for the money if you are looking for value goods. These products may have fewer features and less robust warranties, but you’ll still get the inherent benefits of nylon (durability and resiliency) at a lower price.

Color Fast, Naturally Stain Resistant, Economical.

If you’ve never considered polyester carpeting before, you might want to look at Shaw’s New ClearTouch carpets which are made of a new type of polyester called PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate). This new polyester “ups the ante” in terms of performance. ClearTouch carpets feature:.

Nylon, for example, may be branded or unbranded and, as we mentioned, carpet construction greatly influences performance, price and value. You really can’t judge a carpet by appearance or fiber weight alone. Anso nylon carpets cost more, but you’re getting a premium nylon with excellent construction properties and the warranties reflect this.

Polyester.

If you need stain-resistance, this is your carpet! Just to give you an example, we know a customer who spilled hair dye on her 6 month old polyester carpet.

Key Takeaway: The type of carpet fiber you want really depends on your needs and priorities. A family room and hallway in an active household may require a better-grade nylon carpet. For folks on a budget, a tightly twisted, medium dense PET polyester carpet that is multicolored to help hide traffic and soil may be all that you need.

exceptional softness.
permanent and natural stain resistance, including pet urine stains.
improved strength and better abrasion resistance.
excellent appearance retention and long-term wear.
25 % recycled content from recycled soda and water bottles.
The new PET polyester carpets pack in a lot of performance for the money! They are a great choice for children’s playrooms & bedrooms as well as for people who don’t want to put a lot money into their carpet. We highly recommend you choose a PET polyester with a higher pile and medium-high density to ensure maximum appearance retention and long-term wear.

Exceptionally Stain & Fade-Resistant, Soft, & Budget-Friendly.

Solution dyeing is a pigmentation process in which color is actually built into the fiber when it is formed, thereby becoming an inherent part of the fiber. Since it is not as resilient as other fibers, polypropylene is better suited to low-profile loop (Berber) carpets in which there is less need for superior resiliency. The result is a fiber that feels like cotton, resists soil and stains, and wears better than other olefin carpet.

The four basic fibers used in carpet today are nylon, polypropylene (Olefin), polyester and wool. Since synthetic fibers make up 99 % of the fiber in the US carpet industry, we’ll focus on them. Nylon is more expensive than other synthetic carpet fibers and is the most commonly used carpet fiber today. Nylon is the most versatile of all fibers, providing flexibility in creating a variety of carpet styles– from sumptuous plush to fashion-forward patterns to low-maintenance loop (Berber). You can also refer to the durability ratings on the back of carpet samples to help you assess how a carpet will stand up to traffic.

While not as inherently resilient as nylon, polyester carpets will perform well if constructed well. Choose a polyester carpet with a higher pile and medium-high density to ensure maximum appearance retention and long-term wear. You can also refer to the durability ratings on the back of carpet samples to help you assess how a carpet will stand up to traffic.

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